Are there macroscopic protozoa

Preparation techniques and staining of protozoa and invertebrates for light microscopy

Romei's microscopic technique pp 339-361 | Cite as

  • Erna Aescht
  • Simone Büchl-Zimmermann
  • Anja Burmester
  • Stefan Dänhardt-Pfeiffer
  • Christine Desel
  • Christoph Hamers
  • Guido Jach
  • Manfred Kässens
  • Josef Makovitzky
  • Maria Mulisch
  • Barbara Nixdorf-Bergweiler
  • Detlef Puetz
  • Bernd Riedelsheimer
  • Frank van den Boom
  • Rainer Wegerhoff
  • Ulrich Welsch

Summary

Morphology and systematics, especially those of the small invertebrates ("invertebrates") and the unicellular eukaryotes ("protozoa"), are not closed disciplines in zoology, but very lively fields of work in need of research. The determination (among other things necessary for ecological and phylogenetic investigations) requires microscopic procedures because of its small size and transparency. Many cytological, anatomical and histological methods are applied to these organisms analogously to the methods developed for vertebrates. Nevertheless, there are a number of special features that should be discussed in more detail.

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6.3 Literature

Original article

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Copyright information

© Spectrum Academic Publishing Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erna Aescht
  • Simone Büchl-Zimmermann
  • Anja Burmester
  • Stefan Dänhardt-Pfeiffer
  • Christine Desel
  • Christoph Hamers
  • Guido Jach
  • Manfred Kässens
  • Josef Makovitzky
  • Maria Mulisch
  • Barbara Nixdorf-Bergweiler
  • Detlef Puetz
  • Bernd Riedelsheimer
  • Frank van den Boom
  • Rainer Wegerhoff
  • Ulrich Welsch
  1. 1st Biology Center of the Upper Austrian State Museums Linz
  2. 2.Universitätsklinikum Ulm, Academy for Health Professions, School for Medical-Technical Laboratory Assistance, Ulm-Wiblingen
  3. 3.Stockeldorf
  4. 4.Microscopy Services Dähnhardt GmbHFlintbek
  5. 5. Botanical Institute and Botanical GardenChristian-Albrechts-Universität zu KielKiel
  6. 6. Nikon GmbH Business Unit Microscopes / Optical Metrology Düsseldorf
  7. 7. Phytowelt GreenTechnologies GmbH Cologne
  8. 8.Olympus Soft Imaging Solutions GmbHTechnical Product InformationMünster
  9. 9th abb. NeuropathologyUniversity of Heidelberg-Heidelberg
  10. 10. Christian Albrechts University in Kiel Central microscopy in the Biology Center Kiel
  11. 11. Institute for Physiology and Pathophysiology Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-NürnbergGermany
  12. 12.Digital ImagingNikon GmbH Business Unit Microscopes / Optical MetrologyDüsseldorf
  13. 13. Anatomical Institute: Anatomy IILMU MünchenMünchen
  14. 14.Nikon GmbH division microscopes / optical measurement technology, Düsseldorf
  15. 15.Olympus Europa HoldingKnowledge Management and Service Marketing - MicroscopyHamburg