Which game begins with the word m

 
Play test for the game: MESCHUGGE
Manufacturer: Amigo
Price: 15 DM
Recommended age: 8-108
Number of players: 2-4
Year of publication: 1993
still available: no
Author:
Specialty:
Category: Card Game

Equipment: 66 cards, 28 chips, 1 action die
Presentation: The cards, chips and dice have enough space in the small packaging. Graphically, this game doesn't look like much, as there are only colored words on the cards.
Objective: Each player tries to be the first to throw the correct card onto a so-called command card. At the beginning each player receives a set of cards with names of colors printed on them in different colors. For example, there is the word "green" printed in yellow, blue or red ... All players have identical decks of cards. The command card set also contains words that represent colors and these are also printed in various colors. The command sentence is placed with the chips in the middle of the table.
The game begins when a player hits the die. This can show two events, "word" or "color". Then a command card is turned over and all players try to put the appropriate card from their hand on this card as quickly as possible. Whoever placed the bottom correct card wins the trick.
Now what is the correct card? Let us assume that we have a command card called "blue", but printed in red. If the die has hit "color" beforehand, then the color must be placed next to the word there. In this case the word is "blue", that means you have to take some card out of your hand with a blue lettering printed on it (what is there as a word does not matter, it can be "yellow" in blue and the card was placed correctly ...).
If "Word" was printed on the die, then the players must place a card on which the word matches the color. The color of the command card was red (it was a red card with the writing "blue"), i.e. all players now have to put a writing "red", in which color this "red" was placed does not matter.
Does this sound complicated? It is, at least in the beginning. The title for the game really doesn't fall short.
As I said, the trick is won by the player who was the fastest to put the correct card on the command card. Then you roll the dice again and reveal another command card.
However, there are also special action cards for the command cards. If a word "ROT" can be seen in red, then no cards may be placed on this command card. The player loses a chip if he does so anyway. There is always a chip for every trick won. In addition, each player receives his card back after the trick, so that you always have the complete set of cards.
If a player places a complete counterpart to the command card on display and calls "CONTRA" at the same time, he receives three points as a reward, provided his card is the bottom one in the stack.
End of the game: When all 18 command cards have been played, the game ends and the winner is determined. He got the most chips.
Comment: The game is fun, but nowhere near easy. I still have difficulty finding my way around the different colors and the irritating words, I haven't tried a CONTRA at all, because the "normal" rules are already enough for me. If you are looking for a fancy game that you do not want to play with color-blind people, you will get your money's worth here, provided you keep explaining to your fellow players what should have been played (standard question: "Why ???? I don't understand .. . ")
Conclusion: funny idea, but not exactly easy. Not suitable for color blind players.
Rating: My test subjects were uncomfortable with this game. They constantly struggled with the rules and therefore quickly lost their interest, although this game certainly has its appeal. 4 points are appropriate, since the equipment is not exactly the most beautiful and the instructions do not behave in an exemplary manner with the explanation. Fortunately, there are four examples that explain gaming behavior.

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(c) Claudia Schlee & Andreas Keirat, www.spielphase.de

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